Hyperion- The tallest tree

KarlH's picture

Location

California
United States
41° 10' 47.172" N, 123° 59' 14.1" W
US
General info: 

Hyperion is the world's tallest known living tree. It was discovered in 2006, by naturalists Chris Atkins and Michael Taylor and was measured at 379.3 feet (115.61 m).

The exact location of the tree has not been revealed to the public for fear that human traffic would upset the ecosystem the tree inhabits. The tree is estimated to contain 18,600 cubic feet (530 m3) of wood and to be roughly 700–800 years old.

The Redwood National and State Parks are home to most of the tallest trees in the world. Several other trees have been recorded to be taller than this giant but those have been cut down during the heavy logging of the Redwood region in 60's and 70's. In fact more than 90% of state's ancient forests have been logged during those times until 1978, when the area was purchased and extended into a National Park.

Getting there: 

The exact location of Hyperion is held in secret. The tree grows in a remote location with difficult access somewhere in the Redwood National and State Parks. Only 3 groups of people were ever able to find it and document it.

Costs: 

It´s free to hike in the Redwood National and State Parks.

Interesting places nearby

Hyperion is the world's tallest known living tree. It was discovered in 2006, by naturalists Chris Atkins and Michael Taylor and was measured at 379.3 feet (115.61 m).

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