Baatara Gorge Waterfall

ErichSpiez's picture

Location

Tannourine
Lebanon
34° 10' 24.348" N, 35° 52' 13.332" E
LB
General info: 

This cave bridge waterfall ain´t a scifi movie scene. It’s a real limestone cave carved out of Jurassic limestone over millions of years by winter meltwater. The place is also known as “Three Bridge Chasm” because of the three naturally created bridges hanging one on top of the other.

During the spring melt, a 90–100-metre (300–330 ft) cascade falls behind the three bridges and then down into the 255-metre (820 ft) chasm. The water emerges from underground at a spring in the nearby town of Mgharet al-Ghaouaghir.

The best time to view this waterfall is in March and April, when the snow in the mountains melts. At other times the chances are the waterfall will be dry.

Getting there: 

The Baatara gorge waterfall is located in the Balaa village which falls in between the Laqlouq and Tanourine El Tahta cities in Lebanon. Easiest way to get there is taxi. The drive from Beirut is around two hours.

You will walk to the sinkhole about 7km along the Lebanon Mountain Trail. The path is not very well guideposted so if you have a chance to hire guide, it might not be a bad idea. There are also some guesthouses along the mountain trail and they have personnel that can advise you.

Interesting places nearby

This cave bridge waterfall ain´t a scifi movie scene. It’s a real limestone cave carved out of Jurassic limestone over millions of years by winter meltwater.

The sandstone city of Petra is something you won’t find anywhere else in the world. It is a complete city mostly carved to the sandstone aproximately 300BC.

Wadi Rum offers some of the most extraordinary desert scenery you´ll ever see and is certainly one of the highlights of any visit to Jordan.

The Dead Sea is the saltiest sea in the world with 34,2% salinity. Practically this means that swimming here becomes floating.

The Gulf of Aqaba offers some of the best snorkelling and diving in the world. The temperate climate and gentle water currents have created a perfect environment for the growth of corals and teeming marine life.

Jerash is one of the largest and most well preserved Roman sites outside Italy.